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Introduction to Luxors

What, I hear you asking, What are these?

Luxor ABC's are 8-bit microcomputers that were manufactured by (surprisingly) Luxor Datorer AB in Motala, Sweden at the end of the 1970's and the beginning of the 1980's. The computers are powered by Zilog Z80 8-bit microprocessor at around 3 MHz.

Beside hardware, a good computer needs to have a good firmware. ABC computers have a pretty nice built-in basic interpreter, Basic in ABC80 and Basic II in ABC800 series. [A bunch of Luxors]

There is three models in the ABC800 series:

ABCs have a wide range of peripherals. Here is a list of some of them.

Both ABC800 and ABC806 have even graphic capabilities, ABC800 can display pictures in resolution of 240x240 pixels in 4 colors selectable from the palette of 8 colors. ABC806 haves even better graphics subsystem, including 240x240 pixels in 8 colors and 512x240 in 4 colors from the palette of 8 colors.

ABC802 then doesn't have bitmapped graphics. Only graphical possibilities it has are graphic characters based. Looks pretty much like text-TV without colors.

The end of the ABC800 series, the successor of the ABC80, were around 1986, when Nokia Information Systems bought the Luxor Datorer and ceased the production. Nokia Information Systems is currently known as Fujitsu Services Oy (ex-ICL Data, Ltd), since sold to Fujitsu by Nokia in 1991.

For more information, look at the history of ABCs.

Why to waste time with this ancient technology?

Well, mainly because I have some of these nice computers.

..and I'm quite interested in ancient technology. Look around, either Luxor or Commodore pages and you might notice that I want to recover information about these old systems before it's all lost forever.

Now, if you still have questions still not answered, just ask.. You should also mail if you have any Luxor ABC related information, about history, technical data or anything..


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This page has been created by Sami Rautiainen.
Read the small print. Last updated August 17, 2008.